Saturday, November 28, 2015

The good, bad, and ugly of social media

Yesterday Steve Buttry, on his blog The Buttry Diary, wrote about the good, bad, and ugly on social media.   Read Social media bring out extremes in compassion and rudeness for inspiration and some head shaking.

The inspirational:

I will note only briefly, with appreciation, the many people whose outpouring of support has uplifted and touched me the past couple of years. When I lost my job last year, the encouragement and support on social media (and tips and introductions to people who actually offered me jobs) were overwhelming.

But that support paled in comparison to the virtual hugs I have received since my lymphoma diagnosis last December. During my treatment, which has included some setbacks I won't repeat here, the digital embrace on Facebook, Twitter and CaringBridge was tremendous. But it went beyond words of encouragement and promises of prayers. People I never or barely met in person, as well as friends of Facebook friends whom I truly didn't know, even digitally, sent me a journalism game, a handmade prayer shawl, a personal note about baseball, headgear when my hair disappeared, and, I'm sure, other gifts I'm not recalling at the moment. A person I've met only digitally shaved his head in support of me and another person undergoing chemotherapy.

And now the bad and ugly:

... I mostly mention the positive extreme to provide the necessary contrast to the primary point of this post: Facebook trolls.

Consider other social situations: Political arguments are common, whether at an office holiday party, a meeting of friends in a bar or restaurant or a family gathering. But I can't imagine one of those situations, even in settings that involve lots of drinking, where a stranger would decide to join a conversation that's already under way and take it over, insulting the others in the group and even calling names, without ever making sense.

That happens to me multiple times in a week on Facebook, not just with politics, but politics and cultural issues are the most common settings in my experience. Who, in overhearing a political discussion in a restaurant or at a party where you're mostly or entirely an outsider, would butt in, however certain you were in your position, belittling people to their faces and calling names?

Buttry supports his views with numerous examples of rude, antagonistic, just plain anti-social behavior.

What are your experiences?

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