Tuesday, May 20, 2014

The 1968 riots according to PoPville, Gallaudet, Getty Images, and others

The video from the 1968 riots in DC, posted on Popville in the post Gallaudet Student Video Capture of 1968 Riots on H Street prompted a number of questions from readers wanting to know more about the riots.   If you've not seen the video, watch it.

The Washington Post's A City in Turmoil presents a more expansive view of the riots which started on 14th St NW and later impacted H St NE.   WaPo sets the stage for the map:

On April 4, 1968, civil rights icon Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in Memphis. His murder sparked unrest that same evening in Washington D.C. Over the next few days, violence, looting and arson enveloped the city. Here is an account of the events that damaged -- and destroyed -- large swaths of the District.

The 1968 Riots in Washington, DC, on the National Archives blog, describes some of the damage resulting from the riots.   One account retold in the blog post:

Mr. Jesse McCain an African American man over the age of 50 whose barbershop at 643 P St NW, just off the 7th Street riot corridor, was made a total loss on April 5th, wrote: "I AM TOO OLD TO BE WORRYED ANY MORE I JUST DON’T WANT ANY MORE BUSINESS."

The pictures below make clear why Mr. McCain felt the way he did.


UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1968: Ruins of a store in Washington, D.C., that was destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)



UNITED STATES - CIRCA 1968: soldier standing guard in a Washington, D.C., street with the ruins of buildings that were destroyed during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr. (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)



April 1968: A Black man crosses a street past soldiers and a bombed building during the race riots that followed Martin Luther King's assassination, Washington, DC. (Photo by Hulton Archive/Getty Images)



Firefighters spray water on shops, including Beyda's, Miles Shoes, and Graysons, that were burned during the riots that followed the assassination of Martin Luther King, Jr., Washington, DC, April 1968. (Photo by Buyenlarge/Getty Images)

Finally, consider the notes from a student recently studying the riots.

No comments:

Post a Comment